Hackers break into centralized password manager OneLogin

NEW YORK — Hackers have gained access to OneLogin, an online password manager that offers a single sign-on to multiple websites and services.

OneLogin says in a blog post that it couldn't rule out the possibility that hackers got keys to reading encrypted data, such as stored passwords.

Published reports, however, say OneLogin informed customers that the hackers indeed got that capability. OneLogin didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Password managers help people keep track of passwords for a growing array of websites and services that require one. Instead of having to remember complex passwords for each one, people can just remember a master password. The password service then unlocks other accounts as needed.

In 2015, rival LastPass said hackers obtained some user information — although not actual passwords.

Related News

Science Says: Trump team garbles climate science

Aug 10, 2017

When it comes to the actual science of climate change, what President Trump and his cabinet say conflicts with what science, data and peer-reviewed studies show

Nissan adds range to cheaper Leaf, but new drivers are key

Sep 6, 2017

Nissan's new Leaf goes farther on a charge, but the world's top-selling electric car won't match the driving range of its more expensive competitors

Swimming robot probes Fukushima reactor to find melted fuel

Jul 19, 2017

An underwater robot has entered a badly damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, capturing images of the harsh impact of its meltdown, including key structures that were torn and knocked out of place

You may also like these

Science Says: Trump team garbles climate science

Aug 10, 2017

When it comes to the actual science of climate change, what President Trump and his cabinet say conflicts with what science, data and peer-reviewed studies show

Nissan adds range to cheaper Leaf, but new drivers are key

Sep 6, 2017

Nissan's new Leaf goes farther on a charge, but the world's top-selling electric car won't match the driving range of its more expensive competitors

Swimming robot probes Fukushima reactor to find melted fuel

Jul 19, 2017

An underwater robot has entered a badly damaged reactor at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, capturing images of the harsh impact of its meltdown, including key structures that were torn and knocked out of place

Search
Financial Markets

About Us

Science Tech Today is all about the present with what’s new in the Science and Technology world. “Keep up with today, and don’t be left behind.”

Contact us: sales@sttcom.com