Detectives: 1994 technology slowed search for serial killer

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Detectives who investigated a string of 1994 slayings that Gary Ray Bowles confessed to committing say he probably would have been caught sooner if they had had today's technology.

Bowles is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection Thursday for the murder of Walter Hinton in Jacksonville Beach, Florida. Prosecutors say Hinton was Bowles' sixth and final known victim.

Investigators suspected Bowles almost immediately after the first of the killings: He left a parole document with his name on it in the victim's Daytona Beach home. He also was caught on an ATM camera trying to withdraw money from the victim's bank account.

But Bowles fled from city to city. Investigators say that with the technology they had in the '90s, it sometimes took days to get information that would lead them to him.

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