Houston Will Become An Unbearable Sweltering Oven In 3 Decades

Heat plus humidity equals the heat index and it will result in five months per year - every day - in excess of 100 degrees, many of those days in excess of 105 degrees.

Houston, United States - August 14, 2019 /PressCable/ —

“It is hard to imagine Houston remaining a vibrant city if it becomes hotter and hotter in the next few decades. It will simply become dangerous to be outside when the heat index is over 100 degrees for month after month,” said Raymond Campbell, owner of Dr Cash Home Buyers in Houston, “and the projections for the number of days with a heat index over 105 degrees is absolutely mind-numbing. Living a normal life is not possible in those conditions.”

A recent report by the Union of Concerned Scientists has outlined a dire future for Houston. The group is a nonprofit advocacy organization that analyzes climate change and how it will affect the United States and the world.

The heat index is also referred to as the “feels like” temperature. It is a measure of the thermometer temperature plus a humidity factor that is higher than the thermometer temperature alone. Today in 2019 Houston has 118 days per year with a heat index of 90 degrees or more. Of these 118 days an average of 10 of these days have a heat index of 100 degrees or more.

The projections made by the scientists were based on three levels of action taken to lessen the impact of climate change. Those levels are “no action”, “slow action”, and “rapid action”.

By mid-century or 2050 the scientists are projecting the following possibilities. With “no action” there will be 109 days (30% of the year) with a heat index in excess of 100 degrees. With “slow action” taken there will be 96 days (26% of the year) with a heat index in excess of 100 degrees. The analysis assumes it is too late to take sufficient meaningful “rapid action” by 2050.

“These numbers are staggering. There will be no house buyers in Houston, only house sellers. Unless we as a country make tough decisions Houston will become the next Detroit, losing its economic base and half its population. It will be a disaster equal to war and we will have done it to ourselves,” stated Mr. Campbell.

The numbers are almost incomprehensible when reading the “late century” or 2100 projections. With “no action” there will be 142 days (39% of the year) with a heat index in excess of 100 degrees. With “slow action” taken there will be 105 days (29% of the year) with a heat index in excess of 100 degrees. With “rapid action” taken there will be 96 days (26% of the year) with a heat index in excess of 100 degrees.

Many of these days of extreme heat will be in excess of 105 degrees and some days will be considered “off the charts”. This compares to current days seen in the Sonoran desert in Arizona and southern California.

Maybe Houston is not the worst-case city in the United States. On July 16 and August 5, 2019 Phoenix, Arizona had a high thermometer temperature of 115 degrees. Their month of July had 9 days with 110 degrees or more. Some weather experts are predicting 130 degree days in Phoenix’s future. Good luck to a scorching Phoenix. And a steaming Houston too.

Contact Info:
Name: Raymond Campbell
Email: Send Email
Organization: Dr Cash Home Buyers - Houston
Address: 9801 Westheimer Rd, Suite 302, Houston, TX 77042, United States
Phone: +1-713-820-9363
Website: https://drcashhomebuyers.com/houston-tx/

Source: PressCable

Release ID: 508927

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